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Home >> Daily Dose >> Homeownership: Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda
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Homeownership: Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda

A more positive outlook on homeownership is causing many Americans to feel guilty about their past home-buying decisions.

According to Trulia’s June 2017 survey, conducted online by Harris Poll among 2,264 U.S. adults ages 18 and older, Americans are chiming in on what they feel they coulda, woulda, and shoulda done before purchasing their home.

The survey reveals that, today, 44 percent of Americans have regrets about their current home. Although this represents a decrease compared to five years ago, there are still regrets nonetheless.

Buyers should be aware to avoid the issues that commonly lead to home purchasing regrets. This includes picking the wrong size home, failing to be financially secured, and making the right choice when it comes to buying or renting.

Home size was the biggest regret. It seems surprising that high-income Americans, or those who make $100,000 or more annually, would have any regrets. But over half of this group regrets not trusting that they could afford a bigger home. In fact, 25 percent of those with a household income of $100,000 or more didn’t believe they could even afford to buy a home in the current market.

Americans who found their homes post-housing market bottom in 2012, were more likely to have regrets. Fifty percent reported regrets compared to 42 percent of those who found their home pre-bottom. What was the biggest regret between post-bottom and pre-bottom buyers? It’s financial security.

Doubt compliments regret in the housing market, especially when it comes to the decision to buy or rent. More than half of renters don’t believe they could afford to buy a home in the current market, yet the top regret amongst renters was choosing to rent instead of buying a home.

Ultimately, despite Americans feeling the guilt of a housing decision in the past, it is still believed that homeownership is something to strive for. Either bought or rented, homeownership is a risk. However, being knowledgeable about past regrets can make for better home-buying decisions in the future.

About Author: Staff Writer

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